Daily Archives: January 31, 2010

Coffeehouse observation No. 31

Someone must have been a little distracted earlier. The put the coffee beans in the maker – without grinding them. Oops! The coffee came out and little, um, thin.

 Go to Coffeehouse Observer for more coffeehouse observations.

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Lewiston pastors tour Haiti

They drove the streets of Port-au-Prince, past rows of collapsed buildings and rescue teams. On one pancaked structure that used to be four or five stories high, a man stood alone on the tall pile of rubble with a hack saw, cutting away at rebar.

Maybe someone was still inside. Maybe everything he owned was in there.

“It was a bit surreal,” said Phil Strout, a pastor at Pathway Vineyard Church in Lewiston. “You see the pain, and then you see the human spirit and willingness to help.”

Strout and fellow pastor Allen Austin traveled to the Dominican Republic on Jan. 17 to offer support to Vineyard churches and toured neighboring Haiti seven days after a 7.0-magnitude earthquake struck near the capital of Port-au-Prince. Austin got home last weekend; Strout returned Wednesday night, after a stop in Miami. One takeaway that they’ve reported back to national church leadership: The devastation is 10 times worse than it looks on TV.

Click this link to read the rest of this story by Kathryn Skelton of the Lewiston Sun Journal.

UMPI students go to the dogs for fun, team building – Bangor Daily News

UMPI students go to the dogs for fun, team building – Bangor Daily News.

Information on the UMPI OAPI events is available at http://www.umpi.edu/gentile-hall/oapi

Surprise! Maine can be fun even when it’s cold | Portland Press Herald

 Surprise! Maine can be fun even when it’s cold | Portland Press Herald.

Wind backers decry conflict-of-interest claims

Gov. Baldacci and an ex-PUC chief,

now a wind developer, are among

those who let industry sway policy, critics say

 As Maine rushes to embrace wind power, unnamed critics posting on Internet sites and reader comment pages contend that money and political connections – reaching all the way to the governor’s office – are greasing the skids.

A repeated theme, for instance, focuses on Gov. John Baldacci and Kurt Adams, former chairman of the Maine Public Utilities Commission.

Adams served as Baldacci’s chief counsel. The governor appointed him chairman of the PUC in 2005. Adams left in 2008 to be a top executive at First Wind, the state’s most active wind-power developer. Posters allege that Adams has since benefited from his connections with Baldacci to gain permits and generous taxpayer subsidies for big wind projects.

The charge has become more persistent over the past year, as the pace of energy development has picked up in Maine, fueled by federal stimulus money, efforts to cut reliance on oil and strong support for renewable energy by both Baldacci and President Obama.

But in interviews with the Maine Sunday Telegram, Adams and a spokesman for Baldacci say their conduct has been legal and appropriate, and that organized opponents of wind development are using innuendo to influence public opinion.

The connections aren’t secret, they say, and the charges lack specific – or accurate – accounts of any wrongdoing.

Click this link for the rest of today’s story by Tux Turkel of the Portland Press Herald and Maine Sunday Telegram. (Note: there seems to be a problem with the website’s pages for this story. You may have to click to the second page of the story for the beginning. — KM)

After quake, Winthrop family grows quickly

An expedited adoption process

adds to the brood at

Richard and Carlyn Lenfestey’s home

WINTHROP — Reginald knelt on one of the three light-colored toddler beds lined up near the foot of his parents’ bed.

This one is Richard’s. This one is Sasia’s. This one is Reggie’s.

Though he just turned 3 in December, Reginald clearly relishes his new role of big brother.

On Friday, Richard, 2, and Sasia, 20 months, clung to mom Carlyn Lenfestey, who sat on her bed.

“It’s kind of like the romper room,” she said.

Dad, Matt Lenfestey, surveyed the room and his newly enlarged family, occasionally addressing the children in their native Creole language.

Up until Tuesday, Richard and Sasia lived in a creche, a home for orphans in Lagosette, on Haiti’s north coast.

The Lenfesteys adopted Reginald from the same creche and brought him home to Winthrop last June. Soon thereafter, they started the process of adopting Sasia and Richard.

Click on the link for the rest of the story by Betty Addams in today’s Kennebec Journal.