Daily Archives: February 7, 2010

Tracking down Public Enemy No. 1 in Bangor

You gotta love a good gangster flick, especially when it’s the real thing. Here’s today’s DownEast.com trivia question.

What is Maine’s best-known gun battle?

Answer:

On October 12, 1937, federal agents killed Public Enemy No. 1 Al Brady and two cohorts on Central Street in Bangor in the bloodiest shoot-out in Maine history.

There has been quite a bit of this written about this gunbattle. And I believe they reenact it in Bangor from time to time.

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Friends, family pack church for shooting victim’s service – Bangor Daily News

 Friends, family pack church for shooting victim’s service – Bangor Daily News.

Benefit dinner tops off efforts at Colby College to help Haiti

Colby students hope to raise

$25,000 for the Stand for

Haiti Campaign of Partners in Health

WATERVILLE, Maine — For Jessica Frick and Yanica Faustin, it’s personal.

The Colby College seniors were among those in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, when last month’s devastating earthquake struck, leading to a death toll as high as 200,000 and leaving hundreds of thousands injured and in need of shelter, food and water.

Now that they are back for their final semester at Colby, Frick and Faustin are among a group of students – led by Colby’s Goldfarb Center for Public Affairs and Civic Engagement – who have organized a series of initiatives for the college and greater Waterville community aimed at raising money for Haiti relief. Their efforts will culminate with a benefit dinner later this month.

At that event, Frick and Faustin will speak about their experience of surviving the earthquake and witnessing the devastation while they were in Port-au-Prince, visiting members of Faustin’s Haitian family.

All told, the Colby students hope to raise $25,000, which would be donated to the Stand for Haiti Campaign of Partners in Health. About $7,000 has been raised so far.

“I want people to know,” Frick said. “They need food and water and shelter.”

Click on the link for the rest of today’s story by Scott Monroe of the Waterville Morning Sentinel. (Note: I used the link to the Morning Sentinel’s sister paper, the Portland Press Herald, because it included a photo, which the Morning Sentinel did not. – KM)

COLBY FUNDRAISER
WHAT: Colby for Haiti Benefit
WHEN: Friday, Feb. 26
Reception, auction: 5:30 p.m.
Dinner: 6:30 p.m.
FOR TICKETS: dfgarin@colby.edu

 

Maine Event: The audacity of slope | Portland Press Herald

 Maine Event: The audacity of slope | Portland Press Herald.

Doctor’s regret: ‘My work here is not done’ | Portland Press Herald

 Doctor’s regret: ‘My work here is not done’ | Portland Press Herald.

‘Don’t ask, don’t tell’ splits Maine congressional delegation | Portland Press Herald

 ‘Don’t ask, don’t tell’ splits state delegation | Portland Press Herald.

Reviving Haiti brick by brick, mind by mind

Portland professor and architect

has plans to fortify the Justinian Hospital,

wants his students to design houses

that can be quickly and easily built

He’s never set foot in Haiti, but Portland architect M. Curt Sachs has used his skills to benefit a terribly poor hospital in the country’s second-largest city.

Sachs’ first career was as a cancer therapist. He went back to school to become an architect, and has specialized in designing health care facilities.

The story of his work on the Haitian hospital began two years ago, when he sat next to a water engineer from the Woodard & Curran engineering firm on an airplane flight.

“We got to talking, and I said I was an architect, and my dream forever was to spend time designing better health care facilities for Third World countries,” Sachs said.

The engineer mentioned that her boss, Hugh Tozer, worked with Konbit Sante, a Portland-based nonprofit that has been working for about a decade with Justinian Hospital in Cap Haitien, in northern Haiti.

Sachs connected with Tozer, and he soon began working with the nonprofit, studying building plans for the hospital. He worked with Konbit Sante’s executive director, Nate Nickerson, and with doctors and others who had spent time at the hospital over the years.

Click on the link for the rest of today’s story by Matt Wickenheiser of the Portland Press Herald.