Daily Archives: February 13, 2010

Maine medical team describes conditions in Haiti

The young woman had been pinned in the earthquake, her right leg freshly amputated below the knee. Her left leg was a mess, femur shattered. When Ron Chicoine saw her at (Hospital) Immaculee Conception, she’d been sitting for two weeks waiting for help.

“She was just amazing,” Chicoine said, even positioning herself onto the operating room table when surgeons were ready.

Mona Theriault remembers one 5-year-old boy who’d broken his wrist in a fall and sat in the waiting room, quiet, dripping blood on the floor, bone sticking out.

“There were a lot of stoic people there,” she said.

Chicoine and Theriault, both from St. Mary’s Regional Medical Center, and the other half of their volunteer medical team returned from a trip to Les Cayes, Haiti, last week. The team’s organizer, Cynthia DeSoi, got back Thursday.

They performed roughly 40 surgeries in six days, many on bones that had been broken and crushed in the earthquake that claimed nearly a quarter-million lives. Conditions were sparse. Surgeons wore head lamps when the hospital’s electricity cut out. Tools were soaked in buckets of bleach when the water cut out.

Click on the link for the rest of today’s story by Kathryn Skelton of the Lewiston Sun-Journal.

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Advocate promotes North Woods park

Group says 3.2 million-acre preserve

would aid region as Acadia boosts coast

 

FORT KENT, Maine — There is little chance the forests and wild lands of northern Maine can ever be returned to their pristine state, but a group of conservationists sees no reason they can’t be at least partially restored and protected for generations to come.

RESTORE: The North Woods has advocated the formation of a multimillion-acre park or preserve in north central Maine since 1994, and on Friday the group’s director discussed the plan with students, faculty and guests at the University of Maine at Fort Kent.

“I can’t see another place in the United States where we could even be having this discussion,” said Jym St. Pierre, RESTORE director. “We are talking about 3 million-plus acres that could be acquired without disrupting people or communities.”

The area in question has long been the center of timber and logging operations in Maine going back to the early to mid-1800s when lumber from the great northern forest produced enough raw material to help Bangor become the lumber capital of the world.

Toward the middle and end of that century, the recreational value of the vast tracts of forests began to attract the likes of Henry David Thoreau and later Theodore Roosevelt, with the railroads billing it “America’s wilderness playground.”

Click in the link for the rest of today’s story by Julia Bayly in the Bangor Daily News.

Acadia gun bill prompts lawmaker to vent – Bangor Daily News

Acadia gun bill prompts lawmaker to vent – Bangor Daily News.

Otter feeding mistaken for a struggling sledder – Bangor Daily News

Here’s an update on something I posted yesterday:

 Otter feeding mistaken for a struggling sledder – Bangor Daily News.

Maine troops likely to take on Taliban in the next month | Portland Press Herald

Maine troops likely to take on Taliban in the next month | Portland Press Herald.

Suit against park rangers ends in $45,000 settlement – Bangor Daily News

 Suit against park rangers ends in $45,000 settlement – Bangor Daily News.

Stymied ship unsnarls sticky knot in red tape

MIAMI — The Maine-based relief ship Sea Hunter took two steps forward and one step back Friday in its owner’s quest to deliver supplies to an orphanage in Haiti.

By late afternoon, the ship’s owner, Greg Brooks of Gorham, confirmed that a licensed shipmaster from Orlando, with ties to Maine Maritime Academy, had volunteered to come aboard early next week and ride Sea Hunter to Haiti and then back to its winter berth in Boston.

The decision by Richard Devins, who holds an “unlimited master” license, could satisfy the Coast Guard’s demand that Sea Hunter no longer sail without licensed personnel aboard.

“It’s amazing that this man donated his license and his time to come down and help us,” said Brooks. “All he asked was that when we get back to Boston, we buy him a plane ticket home.”

Taking another step toward their goal, the crew and local dockworkers finished clearing the ship’s cluttered main deck and taking aboard 10 containers of relief supplies donated by a Florida-based charity shortly after 4:30 p.m.

That beat the dock owner’s deadline for loading the containers. Under a more flexible deadline, the move to another berth nearby finally got under way at 9 p.m.

“Everybody pulled together, that’s for sure,” said Rick Woodbury, 49, of Scarborough, a friend of Brooks’ who volunteered for the mission. “It was a good day, no doubt about it.”

Enthusiasm about the forward progress was tempered, however, by news that the U.S. Customs and Border Protection office in Miami had ordered Brooks to provide, by this afternoon, a complete inventory of all goods taken aboard in Portland and Boston.

In addition, customs officials told Brooks he must pay a duty based on the total value of the tons of clothing, food and equipment brought to the ship in late January by people and businesses all over Maine.

Click on the link for the rest of today’s column by Bill Nemitz of the Portland Press Herald.

 

Maine governor sees improving economy

Maine governor sees improving economy

The MP3 and text versions of the address are not on the Maine.gov website, but here’s a link to that landing page. Give it a try later if you want to listen to the address or read the text.

Maine offers free fishing weekend

Maine offers free fishing weekend

Offshore wind farm could save $4.6 billion over 25 years

Below are several links, including one to a press release found on Sustainablebusiness.com about a report published by economic consulting firm Charles River Associates. That report apparently suggests that the Cape Wind offshore wind farm alone could save $4.6 billion – that’s with a B – over the next quarter century.

The proposed project would be off the coast of Massachusetts in Nantucket Sound. It is not stretch that proportionally similar savings could be realized from the eventual construction of a proposed project off Maine’s coast.

Of course, such reports usually are funded by the agency that would benefit. Cape Wind Associates LLC funded the report, according to a news story about the report.

Here’s a link to Friday’s press release: “Cape Wind Report: Offshore wind will cut electric prices by $4.6B

Here’s a link to a previous press release about delays: “Cape Wind faces new obstacle

Here’s a link to Thursday’s story in the Cape Cod Times about the report: “Cape Wind savings pegged at billions

Here’s a link to Cape Wind’s website: http://www.capewind.org/.

Captain volunteers for relief mission

Click for the latest update: Captain volunteers for relief mission