Tag Archives: Appalachian Trail

Mount Katahdin in the sky

Mount Katahdin can be seen in the distance. The photo was taken from Maine Route 163 near Haystack Mountain on the road between Ashland and Presque Isle, Maine. (According to Google Maps, the road is also known as the Presque Isle Road, Haystack Road, Main Street as it goes though Mapleton, Maine, and then the Mapleton Road as it nears Presque Isle.) Kelly McInnis, a classmate of mine from Ashland Community High School Class of (mumble, mumble), took the photo. It must have been an incredibly beautiful day when this photo was taken since Mount Katahdin, the tallest mountain in Maine and the official end of the Appalachian Trail, is more than 100 miles away as the crow flies. Photo by Kelly McInnis

Mount Katahdin can be seen in the distance. The photo was taken from Maine Route 163 near Haystack Mountain on the road between Ashland and Presque Isle, Maine. (According to Google Maps, the road is also known as the Presque Isle Road, Haystack Road, Main Street as it goes though Mapleton, Maine, and then the Mapleton Road as it nears Presque Isle.) Kelly McInnis, a classmate of mine from Ashland Community High School Class of (mumble, mumble), took the photo. It must have been an incredibly beautiful day when this photo was taken since Mount Katahdin, the tallest mountain in Maine and the official end of the Appalachian Trail, is more than 100 miles away as the crow flies. Photo by Kelly McInnis

[I found this story after I originally posted the photo.Frankly, I think these guys were nuts for going up Katahdin in those conditions. Crazy! There is video with the story, but the way. — KM]

Taking on Mount Katahdin in the winter | Bangor Daily News

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Appalachian Trail thru-hiker proposes on snowy Baxter Peak | Bangor Daily News

Appalachian Trail thru-hiker proposes on snowy Baxter Peak | Bangor Daily News.

Appalachian Trail hikers stop before Mount Katahdin ascent | Bangor Daily News

Appalachian Trail hikers stop before Mount Katahdin ascent | Bangor Daily News.

European nations approve Appalachian Trail extension | Bangor Daily News

AUGUSTA, Maine — The North American leg of the International Appalachian hiking trail got a major boost Thursday as chapters in several European countries endorsed the project, which promises to become the world’s largest trail network.

Trail clubs in Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, the Netherlands, England, Ireland and Wales formally joined the International Appalachian Trail during a meeting in Aviemore, Scotland, IAT officials said.

The IAT is an extension of the Appalachian Trail, which extends from northern Maine to northern Georgia along the Appalachian Mountains. The IAT begins near Maine’s Mount Katahdin and extends through eastern Canadian provinces. Hikers can continue on the IAT by crossing the Atlantic Ocean by boat or plane and picking it up in Greenland and Iceland, IAT officials said.

“By joining, they [the international chapters] will set up a trail in their territory,” IAT geologist Walter Anderson said. “Now we have jumped the pond.”

Click for the rest of the story by Glen Adams of The Associated Press in the Bangor Daily News.

 

Summer tradition at East Orland lodge offers magical experience for campers | Bangor Daily News

Back in the summers of 1962 and 1963, Bob Mercer signed on as a counselor at a boys camp in East Orland called Flying Moose Lodge.

For two summers, he led excursions into the wilds of Maine, from Baxter State Park to the Allagash to the Appalachian Trail.

After two years, he left Flying Moose Lodge.But Flying Moose Lodge never left him.

“There’s an ambiance about the place,” Mercer, a Bucksport resident, said earlier this week, revisiting his old stomping grounds as another season’s Flying Moosers (“strong and husky, here we gather, tanned and dusky,” according to a popular camp song) went about their daily business. “There’s a feeling that when you walk down the path, the world ended at the public beach, and this is a whole different world here. After 40 years, it still feels the same.”

Click the link for the rest of this story by John Holyoke in the Bangor Daily News.

 Flying Moose Lodge

Where: On Craig Pond, East Orland

What: A trip-focused summer camp for boys

When: Seven weeks each summer since 1921 (with a hiatus during World War II)

Who: Owned and directed by Chris and Shelly Price

How to get in touch: Go to www.flyingmooselodge.com for more information.

On Mount Katahdin, sharing a family tradition| Bangor Daily News

On Mount Katahdin, sharing a family tradition| Bangor Daily News

Maine to Morocco: Appalachian Trail to leap abroad? | Bangor Daily News

Maine to Morocco: Appalachian Trail to leap abroad? – Bangor Daily News.

Maine governor expected to sign bill regulating guns in parks | The Portland Press Herald / Maine Sunday Telegram

Governor expected to sign bill regulating guns in parks | The Portland Press Herald / Maine Sunday Telegram.

Gun OK may not last long in Acadia | The Portland Press Herald / Maine Sunday Telegram

Gun OK may not last long in Acadia | The Portland Press Herald / Maine Sunday Telegram.

Acadia gun bill prompts lawmaker to vent – Bangor Daily News

Acadia gun bill prompts lawmaker to vent – Bangor Daily News.

Volunteer opportunities maintaining Appalachian Trail in Maine

I spotted on GreenBiz.com a request for volunteers to work on the Appalachian Trail this summer and wanted to pass it along to my Maine friends and to those who might be looking for a volunteer vacation.

Everything I’ve read about the Appalachian Trail – and that hasn’t been nearly enough – indicated that the Appalachian Trail that runs through Maine some of the roughest of the rough hiking trail. The Appalachian Trail goes from Maine to Georgia.

If I was living nearby or had the opportunity to take a volunteer vacation, I certainly would consider it.

Here is the ad asking for volunteers.

Appalachian Trail volunteers  

Maine Appalachian Trail Club, Garland, ME (various trail locations)  

An Exceptional Volunteer Opportunity

Join the Maine Trail Crew and work on Maine’s Appalachian Trail. Help preserve this precious and wild resource for future generations of hikers. An Enthusiastic staff awaits your arrival and is looking forward to building trail with you.

Work, hike and live in some of the wildest places left in the Eastern U.S. Projects focus on rebuilding and restoring heavily impacted sections of the Appalachian Trail. Crews utilize Griphoist® rigging equipment, rock drills and hand tools to build stone steps, waterbars and retaining walls to repair the Appalachian Trail.

Persons of age 18 or older – of all backgrounds – are welcome. Enthusiasm, good health, energy and adaptability are vital. Willingness to follow instructions, comply with safety rules, and share camp chores is essential. Experience helps, but we teach trail skills here.

Benefits:

  • Transportation to and from Bangor International Airport
  • Tents and packs are provided if needed
  • All meals are provided, including off time between work sessions
  • Make new friends
  • Learn new trail skills
  • Lots of hiking on the AT
  • Build works in stone to last for the ages
  • Stay in mountain-side campsites
  • See Maine moose and hear the loons
  • Recreational trips to the mountains, ocean and lakes
  • Receive a Maine Trail Crew t-shirt
  • Feel great about what you have done for the AT.

Time Frame: One- to six-week sessions, June 26 to Aug. 18, 2010

You can apply for the opportunity by clicking on the link to the GreenBiz.com ad or going to the Maine Appalachian Trial Club website.

Maine’s first conservationist

Here’s the latest from DownEast.com’s trivia selection. I’m not sure “treehugger” is PC any longer, but what the heck. It is Maine, after all.

Who was Maine’s first treehugger?

Gov. Percival Baxter, who was considered something of a radical in the 1920s when he proposed a public park surrounding and protecting Mount Katahdin. Rejected by the legislature, Baxter used his own money to create his “forever wild” reserve. Today more than 60,000 people each year visit the two hundred thousand-acre Baxter State Park to enjoy the stunning beauty that his vision first recognized.

Mount Katahdin is the official northern tip of the Appalachian Trail, although some believe it actually goes to Mars Hill, Maine. My family went camping in Baxter State Park when The Sis and I were young. It was a fantastic adventure — hiking, skipping stones on water, watching the black bears wander into the park’s garbage dump for evening chow. As I recall, we may have stopped off at the Lumbermen’s Museum in Patten during the same trip.