Tag Archives: Bangor Daily News

‘It’s going to take a lot of work’: Railway owner dreams of passenger service from Portland to Montreal | WGME via Bangor Daily News

FRYEBURG, Maine — Critics say it can’t be done, but if the owners of a proposed passenger train service are able to pull it off, it could bring hundreds of jobs and thousands of tourists to Maine. The last time the tracks in Fryeburg were used to carry passengers from Portland to Montreal, Canada, was in 1959. Now, 55 years later, plans are in the works to bring passenger train service back, linking Portland to the White Mountains in New Hampshire and to Montreal.

“I think this area needs that. I think the country needs that,” says Lisa Johnson of Chocorua, New Hampshire.

She’s already imagining how nice it would be to take a train to the Fryeburg Fair instead of fighting all that traffic.

“It’s a more relaxed way to travel,” she added. “You’re not fighting the traffic. You’re sitting back and relaxing, enjoying it.”

Better still, the president of Golden Eagle Railway says the new rail service would generate 200 full time jobs with benefits.

Read more here.

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Let’s celebrate the Maine lobster | Bangor Daily News

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http://bangordailynews.com/2014/06/17/opinion/lets-celebrate-the-maine-lobster/

Photo of moose cow, calf wins Aroostook County Tourism contest | Bangor Daily News

PRESQUE ISLE, Maine — Paul Pierce of Mars Hill has been chosen as the overall winner of the Aroostook County Tourism summer photo contest for his picture of a moose cow and calf.

Other category winners include Tracey Ackerson of Woodland for the scenic views category, Johnnie Cancelarich of Presque Isle for outdoor recreation, Fred Grant of Houlton for cities and towns and Lori Prosser of Houlton for festivals and events.

All winning entries are available to view on the website at www.visitaroostook.com and the Aroostook County Tourism Facebook page.

Click to read more on the story in the Bangor Daily News on the photo contest.

25 things to do this fall — festivals, foliage and fun | Bangor Daily News

As you bid goodbye to summer — so long flip flops, air conditioner and iced beverages on the patio — you say hello to an even more fleetingly beautiful part of the year. The crispness in the air arrived last week, and the leaves have just barely begun to change color.

Summer may look pretty fantastic after four months of winter, but autumn feels just lovely after four months of summer. Enjoy it while you can by trying any of the 25 things to do this fall that we’ve assembled for you.

Click for more on the story by Emily Burnham in the Bangor Daily News.

Video: Intrepid reporter risks all to show off snow tubing | Bangor Daily News

Video: Intrepid reporter risks all to show off snow tubing | Bangor Daily News.

Show us your ice shack — it might be worth $1,000 | Bangor Daily News

[My Mom says she’s spotted a couple of ice shacks on the lake when she lives. It’s a very chilly spot. Brrr! — KM]

Show us your ice shack — it might be worth $1,000 | Bangor Daily News.

America’s First Mile dedicated in Fort Kent | Bangor Daily News

America’s First Mile dedicated in Fort Kent – Bangor Daily News.

Rediscover recycling and reuse | Bangor Daily News

Rediscover recycling and reuse | Bangor Daily News.

Bangor Daily News website offers Maine health data | Bangor Daily News

Bangor Daily News website offers Maine health data | Bangor Daily News

 

5 things to do this Aug. 6 weekend | Bangor Daily News

5 things to do this Aug. 6 weekend – Bangor Daily News.

5 things to do this July 30 weekend | Bangor Daily News

5 things to do this July 30 weekend – Bangor Daily News.

Maine connections on ‘Last Comic,’ ‘America’s Got Talent’ bring state to reality | Bangor Daily News

Maine connections on ‘Last Comic,’ ‘America’s Got Talent’ bring state to reality | Bangor Daily News

Making Maine Work| Bangor Daily News

Making Maine Work| Bangor Daily News

5 things to do in Maine this weekend

5 things to do in Maine this weekend

Bangor Daily launches expanded Outdoors coverage | Bangor Daily News

Bangor Daily launches expanded Outdoors coverage – Bangor Daily News.

Revolutionary women and a 16-mile trek through the woods

DownEast.com’s trivia question for today proves Maine women are pretty tough.

Who was Hannah Weston?

Answer

Hannah Weston was a Revolutionary War heroine who carried ammunition sixteen miles through the woods to Machias to aid patriots who had captured the British ship Margaretta.

I cannot imagine carrying ammunition 16 yards let alone 16 miles through the woods, especially to Machias where the terrain is uneven and certainly brushy and swampy since is located on Maine’s rugged coastline.

The Daughters of the American Revolution chapter in Machias is named for Hannah Weston, who was 17 or so when she and another woman lugged powder to Machias, according to a recent Bangor Daily News story. There’s even a festival.

By the way, the battle to capture the HMS Margaretta is called by some the “Lexington of the Seas” because of its role in the American Revolutionary War. It was the first naval battle.

Here are links to Wikipedia pages on Machias, which has a line about Hannah, and the Battle of Machias.

Oh, and for full disclosure, I played soccer on the Ashland Community High School varsity team and occasionally we played Machias in early rounds of the state tournament. But I won’t hold that against the people of Machias or Hannah Weston.

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State to award 3,140 moose hunting permits today | Bangor Daily News

[I posted a link earlier to a Portland Press Herald story on the moose permit drawing, but the Bangor Daily News did a much better job and has quite a bit more information that the Press Herald. Here’s a link to the BDN version. — KM]

State to award 3,140 moose hunting permits today – Bangor Daily News.

Remembering just how very important fishing is to me and ME: Part 1

News stories and blogs on Maine’s major media websites not long ago reminded me just how every important fish and fishing are to me and Maine.

I’m not talking about commercial fishing. Commercial fishing in Maine is huge. In Maine, fishing is a way of life and enormous to the economy of the entire state. Fish is king in Maine.

What I’m talking about instead is the kind of fishing I learned as a kid – sports fishing and fishing for sustenance on inland waterways. The fishing I learned was a rite of passage and an outdoors activity to feed the body and soul.

And the mosquitoes and black flies, but that’s a different blog entry.

Stories on the websites of the Bangor Daily News, Portland Press Herald and Down East magazine were big in reminding me about the importance of fishing to socialization, culture, and heritage in Maine.

By rough estimates, I started fishing 40 years ago. And while I haven’t had the opportunity to wet a line in recent years, it remains central to the person I was, the person I am, and, I suspect, the person I will become.

No, this is not a story to match “A River Runs Through It,” the novel and subsequent movie that told of lives and deaths and the lessons learned by fishing a river.

Frighteningly, invasive species are crowding native species from Maine’s streams, ponds, and lakes.

The story of inland fishing is a bit murky. There is some hope and more than a bit of concern.

A Portland Press Herald story told of an effort to restore an ancient fish, the Arctic char, in Big Reed Pond. It is “ancient” because biologists believe the fish has been here since the last ice age. That’s not just your my-bones-hurt-and-feel-ancient sort of ancient. That is seriously ancient.

The problem for the orange-colored char started when a well-meaning sports fisherman introduced rainbow smelt in the water as way to provide more food for the char. But that backfired when the smelt ate small char and the char’s food.

But a state wildlife biologists, a private fishery, local lodge owners, and grants from Maine Outdoor Heritage Fund are slowly making the future brighter for the Arctic char.

George Smith’s DownEast.com blog some time ago focused on fishing. One titled “The battle between natives and those ‘from away’” especially caught my attention, of course, for its use of “from away.” After all, this blog is titled “Letters From Away.”

But I became far more interested in what he had to write about native fish and those that have been illegally or inadvertently introduced into Maine waters than I was with his use of the Mainer phrase for anything not of or from Maine.

Wildlife officials from Maine to California and many other areas in between are facing similar problems – non-native fish and other aquatic life being introduced into waterways and those species forcing out native fish and other aquatic life. Some are introduced by accident when carried on a boat or other gear that was not properly washed down or intentionally introduced by so-called sportsmen believing it would be good to have, say, bass or walleye in a trout habitat. I even found a story about a koi being pulled from a Maine pond. Koi?!

Either way, native species should be given a chance to survive and thrive in their natural habitat.

Here’s something from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s website on invasive species:

Invasive species are organisms that are introduced into a non-native ecosystem and which cause, or are likely to cause, harm to the economy, environment or human health. It is important to note that when we talk about a species being invasive, we are talking about environmental boundaries, not political ones. In addition to the many invasive species from outside the U.S., there are many species from within the U.S. that are invasive in other parts of the country.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is the only agency of the U.S. Government whose primary responsibility is the conservation of the nation’s fish, wildlife, and plants. Because of our responsibilities, the Service is very concerned about the impacts that invasive species are having across the Nation. Invasive plants and animals have many impacts on fish and wildlife resources. Invasive species degrade, change or displace native habitats and compete with our native wildlife and are thus harmful to our fish, wildlife and plant resources.

The website also provides FAQs, resources, laws, and other information.

The Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife also has quite a bit of information. Follow this link and click on “Illegal Fish Stocking” for specific information. There is also information about invasive aquatic plants.

Here are links to some of those stories and blog entries.

The battle between natives and those ‘from away’ | DownEast.com

Sound science produces good Maine fisheries | DownEast.com

Restoration raises hope for future of native fish | Portland Press Herald/Maine Sunday Telegram

Salmon return in record numbers: Experts ‘cautiously optimistic’ about high figures | Bangor Daily News

Invasive species threatening Maine waters: DIF&W says illegally introduced fish could disrupt ecosystems, local fisheries | Bangor Daily News

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Fort Kent starts new phase of flood planning | The Portland Press Herald / Maine Sunday Telegram

Fort Kent starts new phase of flood planning | The Portland Press Herald / Maine Sunday Telegram.

Friends, family pack church for shooting victim’s service – Bangor Daily News

 Friends, family pack church for shooting victim’s service – Bangor Daily News.