Tag Archives: employment

Yacht maker offers to buy Eastport’s Boat School | Bangor Daily News

EASTPORT, Maine — One of the world’s premier yacht makers, who has previously focused his manufacturing efforts in Taiwan, China and Tampa Bay, Fla., has made an offer that could turn around the financially struggling city of Eastport. David Marlow of Marlow Yachts approached the City Council during a workshop this week and floated a proposal to buy The Boat School, which is owned by the city and leased to Husson University.

His plans include expanding The Boat School program from a two-year to a four-year marine trades program while keeping Husson University involved. He also plans to revamp the campus, expand the existing boatyard and build an on-site yacht manufacturing facility that could create 100 new jobs.

“This could be a godsend for Eastport,” City Manager Jon Southern said Thursday. “This business is compatible with every city goal for our working waterfront. It is ecologically friendly. It would create high-quality jobs. It protects The Boat School and retains the partnership we have with Husson.”

Click for the rest of the story by Sharon Kiley Mack in the Bangor Daily News.

 

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New TD Bank call center in Auburn could provide 3,000 jobs | Bangor Daily News

 New TD Bank call center in Auburn could provide 3,000 jobs – Bangor Daily News.

Making Maine Work| Bangor Daily News

Making Maine Work| Bangor Daily News

Verso Paper hires more than 200 workers | Bangor Daily News

Verso Paper hires more than 200 workers – Bangor Daily News.

Maine jobs news good, but still leaves cause for concern | The Portland Press Herald / Maine Sunday Telegram

Our View: Job news good, but still leaves cause for concern | The Portland Press Herald / Maine Sunday Telegram.

Oh, to be in search of a job – still

But I think things are looking up – at least, I think they are

Not a particularly great week for the job search. I was only able to get three resume packages out – one on Monday and two on Tuesday – and had only a view or two on resumes posted on various job websites.

But it was much better than a few very slow weeks that I have had during this search and my online portfolio has received more visits in the past couple of weeks than it has in months, so I remain upbeat that I will find employment.

I had a couple of days this week during which technical problems bogged me down. I use an HP laptop at empresso, the Stockton coffeehouse I frequent most often. And when certain other people are there running HP or Compaq laptops my WiFi seems to turn to mush and I can barely load even the best websites. There was a woman there Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday and I could barely get anything done online when she was there.

(And on Thursday she spent most of her time there talking loudly on her cellular telephone. She wasn’t even working online that very much, she just had the laptop on and connected. I felt a mild urge to ask her: “Do you realize how very loud you are?!” But I’m not that confrontational.)

I also have a problem sometimes when nearby laptop user is using a similar wireless mouse to the Microsoft mouse I use. I’m guessing in both cases it is a matter of similar frequencies crossing over. (I’m not technically endowed so please forgive if does not make perfect technical sense. It does to me.)

When either problem happens I simply disconnect the wireless connection and work on something on my desktop. I’ve starting putting aside work that I can do in such instances. That helps keep the blood pressure down a bit.

Yesterday was sort of a throw-away day, too. I received a phone message late Thursday from the publisher of an East Coast newspaper. I had emailed them a resume package last week for an opening there.

Unfortunately, I did not notice the message until it was after 6 p.m. or so EST so I emailed her that I would return the call the following morning, which I did. I waited for a few hours yesterday for a return call and headed out to empresso when it got to be about 4:30 p.m. EST. Perhaps she’ll call on Monday.

Or not.

I make it a point not to let that sort of thing bother me too much. It would have been nice to get some job searching done yesterday, but that’s the way it goes.

I truly wish my portfolio was better, more stunning, more compelling. Much of my writing is not easily accessible online. Much of my carry involved moving pages, writing editorial, directing news coverage and reporters, for which there are no bylines. Anyway …

Next week I’ll get down to it again. Perhaps I can double the number of resume packages.

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The Economics of Wind: What’s behind the interest, and what’s it mean for jobs | Lewiston Sun Journal

[I’m a wind-power proponent in that I strongly believe we need to greatly reduce our foreign oil addiction. And we need to find a much more environmentally friendly energy source. Below is the top section of the first part of a two-part series by the Lewiston Sun Journal on wind energy. I intend to link the second part tomorrow, whether either part supports my beliefs or not. It is an important issue and an important time for energy in Maine. So, it is important to have as much information as possible, even if you or I do not want to know that information. – KM]

Sun Journal Editor’s note: This is the first of a two-part series. The second part will run on Monday, April 12.

As Maine inches toward its goal of more wind power development, the financial justifications for and against are almost as hard to grasp as the wind itself.

Environmental activist Jonathan Carter, for example, wrote in a recent newspaper opinion piece that up to 60 percent of the cost of wind power projects is covered by federal subsidies. That figure’s important, with wind power opponents saying wind shouldn’t rely on high government subsidies and proponents saying it deserves the same treatment as other energy suppliers.

When asked, Carter pointed to National Wind Watch as the source of his information.

National Wind Watch pointed to a semi-retired former coal official in Virginia.

When the Sun Journal contacted that man, he pointed to a Los Angeles lawyer who works with wind farm developers … and his math, it turns out, isn’t so clear-cut.

Click on the link for the rest of today’s story by Kathryn Skelton in the Lewiston Sun Journal.

Mitchell scholars talk jobs at conference | Bangor Daily News

Mitchell scholars talk jobs at conference – Bangor Daily News.

Maine eyes federal jobs bill

Maine summit seeks

ideas from businesses

 AUGUSTA, Maine — Legislative leaders called on Congress Tuesday to pass another stimulus package featuring tax breaks for small businesses that add employees, investment in infrastructure improvements and additional financial relief for states.

Gov. John Baldacci, meanwhile, held a jobs summit with business leaders from around the state on Tuesday to solicit ideas on steps government can take to help companies and the state grow their way out of the recession.

 “That’s why every one of you gets up every day and it’s certainly before me every single day,” Baldacci told representatives from 80 businesses across the state.

At a midday press conference, Democratic leaders from the House and Senate urged Congress to move forward with a jobs stimulus bill reinvesting money from the federal bailout of financial institutions, known as the Troubled Asset Relief Program, or TARP.

Click on the link for the rest of today’s story by Kevin Miller of the Bangor Daily News.

 

Maine lawmakers call for jobs bill

Maine lawmakers call for jobs bill