Tag Archives: Moosehead Lake

Lakes, Islands, Mountains, Moosehead | Maine magazine

The ancient mountains and cliffs above Moosehead are tempting us. How do we get closer? For starters, we’ll need a motorboat and a floatplane.

Nearly 70 years old, the old bird just doesn’t want to start when it’s this hot outside.Pilot John Willard explains the situation while we sit behind him in the narrow cockpit of his 1947 Piper floatplane.

The engine isn’t turning after two, three, and four tries. Hot is a relative term—it’s mid-70s at most on this early summer evening—but this is northern Maine. Earlier, on the drive up Route 15, we’d stopped for a cone of maple-nut ice cream at a take-out, and I heard another customer complaining of the day’s “oppressive” temperatures. Willard admits he’s no fan of steamy weather himself. (Much of the year, this is snowmobile territory, and sleds fly across the frozen-solid lake.)

Read more of this nice travel piece on Moosehead Lake by Sandy Lang with photography by Peter Frank Edwards in the September 2914 issue of Maine magazine.

Advertisements

Finding the quiet delight of Maine: Visitors from state, beyond continue to discover beauty of state parks | Maine Sunday Telegram

PRESQUE ISLE, Maine – When Scott Thompson, the Aroostook State Park manager, was invited to a trade show in Boston this spring, he didn’t let an opportunity pass him by.

Thompson, the manager of Maine’s northern-most state park, looked at the convention center full of intrepid tourists and seized the chance to send them 10 hours north.

“I was told to just hand out brochures. But I just thought, ‘Here we go,’ ” said Thompson, a Presque Isle native.

The affable and amusing Thompson told as many people as he could about the beauty of Aroostook County in summertime, about the 15 miles of Nordic ski trails he grooms around the state park in winter, and about the booming winter carnival held there now, which increased in attendance from 100 to 700 in three years.

Thompson must have intrigued a few tourists because attendance at Aroostook State Park is up 30 percent this year, according to the Maine Bureau of Parks and Lands.

Click for the rest of the story by Deirdre Fleming in the Maine Sunday Telegram.

Maine author to sign new book | Bangor Daily News

Maine author to sign new book – Bangor Daily News.

Ice-out breaks statewide records | Bangor Daily News

Seasonal thaw comes

earlier than expected

 FORT KENT, Maine — Let Capistrano keep its swallows and Hinckley, Ohio, is welcome to its buzzards. Any Mainer knows the real harbinger of spring is ice-out.

Largely regarded as the time when a body of water may be navigated from one end to the other unimpeded by ice, the seasonal event has spawned countless contests, raffles, impromptu parties, webcams and even its own Facebook fans’ page for the lakes and rivers around the state.

This year, many of Maine’s lakes are already clear of ice days and even weeks ahead of schedule.

“This year is extremely unusual,” Tim Thurston, owner of Maine Lake Charts of Gardiner, said Thursday. “I would not be surprised if every lake in Maine has a record or near record for ice-out.”

Click on the link for the rest of today’s story by Julia Bayly in the Bangor Daily News.

Nation’s first forest fire tower built in Maine

OK, I have a special reason to like today’s DownEast.com trivia question. Two of them, actually.

When I was a kid there was a Disney TV movie, “Fire on Kelly Mountain” (1973), in which Larry Wilcox played a young guy who works in a forest fire lookout tower, becomes bored, and ends up fighting a lightning strike.

And because I ended up being a wildland firefighter for three summers while attending college in Chico, California.

Where was the country’s first forest fire lookout tower built?

Answer:

In 1905, on Squaw Mountain, since renamed Big Moose Mountain.

Big Moose Mountain is in Piscataquis County, Maine, by the way. It’s near Moosehead Lake.

Two snowmobilers go through open water on Moosehead Lake | The Kennebec Journal, Augusta, ME

Two snowmobilers go through open water on Moosehead Lake | The Kennebec Journal, Augusta, ME.

The Maine Warden Service offers these tips for ice safety:

• Never guess the thickness of the ice. Check it in several different places by making a test hole, starting at the shore and continuing
as you go out.

• Check the ice with a partner. If alone, wear a lifejacket.

 • If ice at the shoreline is cracked or squishy, stay off. Watch out for thin, clear or honeycombed ice. Dark snow and dark ice are other signs of weak spots.

Otter feeding mistaken for a struggling sledder – Bangor Daily News

Here’s an update on something I posted yesterday:

 Otter feeding mistaken for a struggling sledder – Bangor Daily News.

Maine wardens search Moosehead Lake for person

Warden Service issues

another warning about thin ice

 GREENVILLE — The Maine Warden Service has issued another stern warning for people to be vigilant when venturing onto bodies of water as they followed up on reports Thursday that someone was observed struggling in the water near the East Outlet of Moosehead Lake.

Three people on shore reported to wardens Thursday that they had observed a person struggling in the water near Wilsons campground, which prompted a search by game wardens and other law enforcement officers in the region.

Wardens used an airboat to search the water, and Warden Pilot Charlie Later searched from the air after the 2 p.m. report, but they did not see any signs of a person in the water, Deborah Turcotte, the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife spokeswoman, said Thursday evening.

Turcotte said while there have been no reports of a missing person, wardens do plan to bring in a dive team today to resume their search of the area where the person reportedly was spotted in the water.

Click on the link for the rest of the story by Diana Bowley of the Bangor Daily News.

 

Outdoors enthusiasts delight in state’s conservation efforts – Bangor Daily News

In recent years Maine has tripled the amount of land set aside for conservattion. I really, really like the idea of protecting the land from development.

That said, there are some very interesting points raised in the comments section of the online story, mostly about accessibility and the loss of tax revenue. But protecting lands could mean new jobs in outdoor recreation, environmental education, etc.

Outdoors enthusiasts delight in state’s conservation efforts – Bangor Daily News.

There are several mentions in this story about how large paper and timber mills used to own much of the land and that those companies allowed access for recreational uses, including hunting, fishing and snowmobiling. I recall as a child stopping at a gate in the woods to be let onto those lands. Going through the gates meant being able to enjoy the outdoors.

Oh, and here’s a link to a Maine Public Broadcasting Network story about the acting state conservation commissioner offering to help the state close its budge gap. One of the things to be cut — a helicopter. And, according to the story, there’s already an offer for the helo.

Here’s a link to that story.

New Acting Conservation Chief Outlines Budget Cuts

Outdoors enthusiasts delight in state’s conservation efforts – Bangor Daily News

In recent years Maine has tripled the amount of land set aside for conservattion. I really, really like the idea of protecting the land from development.

That said, there are some very interesting points raised in the comments section of the online story, mostly about accessibility and the loss of tax revenue. But protecting lands could mean new jobs in outdoor recreation, environmental education, etc.

Outdoors enthusiasts delight in state’s conservation efforts – Bangor Daily News.

There are several mentions in this story about how large paper and timber mills used to own much of the land and that those companies allowed access for recreational uses, including hunting, fishing and snowmobiling. I recall as a child stopping at a gate in the woods to be let onto those lands. Going through the gates meant being able to enjoy the outdoors.