Tag Archives: snow

Half a foot of snow expected in Maine this weekend | Bangor Daily News

PORTLAND, Maine — A weekend storm could bring plenty of chills to the state this Halloween weekend, as the National Weather Service said Friday that more than six inches of snow is expected in many parts of Maine.

A winter storm watch has been posted throughout the state, according to Mal Walker of the National Weather Service in Caribou.

The advisory calls for 4-8 inches of snow in Penobscot, Hancock and Washington counties and includes Greater Bangor, Ellsworth, Mount Desert Island, Machias and Eastport. The advisory notes heavy, wet snow and 15-25 mph winds with gusts up to 35 mph will create hazardous traveling conditions.

Click to read more of this story in the Bangor Daily News.

 

Storm spurs emergency declaration | The Portland Press Herald / Maine Sunday Telegram

Storm spurs emergency declaration | The Portland Press Herald / Maine Sunday Telegram.

Storm brings 2 feet of snow to some areas | Bangor Daily News

Storm brings 2 feet of snow to some areas | Bangor Daily News.

Ski resorts welcome weather | The Portland Press Herald / Maine Sunday Telegram

Ski resorts welcome weather | The Portland Press Herald / Maine Sunday Telegram.

Sunday River opens first ski trail in the U.S. | Bangor Daily News

Sunday River opens first ski trail in the U.S. | Bangor Daily News.

NOAA: ‘Unmistakable’ evidence shows world getting warmer

Warm, dry winter means savings for Maine cities, towns | Lewiston Sun Journal

Warm, dry winter means savings for Maine cities, towns | State | Sun Journal.

Wind-whipped storm wreaks havoc in Maine | The Portland Press Herald / Maine Sunday Telegram

Wind-whipped storm wreaks havoc in Maine | The Portland Press Herald / Maine Sunday Telegram

Crews working to restore power throughout Maine | Kennebec Journal

Maine tussles with mix of wind, rain and snow | Bangor Daily News

From the Bangor Daily News, Mainers are reminded to:

• Monitor weather forecasts closely for expected conditions in your area.

• Stay clear of flooded roadways. Respect all barricades, and report flooded areas to local officials.

• Use extreme care driving in wintry conditions. Stay off the roads if possible.

• If power goes out, use generators and alternate heat sources safely. Never run a generator in a basement or attached garage. Carbon monoxide poisoning may result.

• Continue to keep roofs clear of snow. Snowfall may be heavy and wet. Make sure heating system vents are clear to prevent carbon monoxide from backing up in the home.

• Protect outside oil tanks from snow and ice falling from the roof. Serious oil spills can result.

• Check on neighbors, family and friends who may need special assistance to clear snow and to weather the storm.

Hundreds ‘take it outside’ at Aroostook State Park – Bangor Daily News

Hundreds ‘take it outside’ at Aroostook State Park – Bangor Daily News.

Salting roads before snow may save lives – Bangor Daily News

Salting roads before snow may save lives – Bangor Daily News.

To read the report, go to www.umaine.edu/files/2010/02/Winter-Road-Maint-Final.pdf

This Maine native just can’t get into the Winter Games

I really should love the Winter Olympics. After all, I grew up in snowy, wintery Maine where winter sports lasted longer in the year than summer sports. Remember, three seasons there – winter, mud and July.

But not so much.

I couldn’t even get into it after a Maine kid, Seth Wescott, defended his Olympic gold medal by winning the cross-snowboarding competition. I still couldn’t get into it after Hannah Kearney, Lindsey Vonn, Julia Mancuso, Shannon Bahrke, Apolo Anton Ohno, Shani Davis, Chad Hedrick, Shaun White, Bode Miller, and more all picked up medals.

And I really don’t care about the medal count. The Cold War is over. There doesn’t seem much point in waging a Gold War.

As a kid I did frolic in the snow. I did a fair amount of tobogganing, cross-country skiing, snowshoeing and snowmobiling. I even ice skated for a while as a child, but I grew tired of falling on my bum. More than once while skating at the rink near the artisan well at the south end of Portage Lake did my feet come out from under me, landing me quite squarely on my tail bone. OK, “tail bone” is not the medical name for that remnant of an ancient tail, but you know exactly what I mean. And I mostly enjoyed the tobogganing, skiing, snowshoeing, snowmobiling, and, yes, even the ice skating.

There is no feeling of peace and aloneness quite like the one experienced after skiing or snowshoeing into the forest miles from civilization to stand and hear the bitterly cold wind blow through the tops of tall conifers and white birches. There you hear the heavy plop, plop, plop sound of snow being dislodged from branches and falling to the snow-covered ground below. It is so peaceful, so alone and so “quiet” by city standards that even the creatures of childhood stories, stories of boogeymen and headless woodsmen, come back to life just a tiny bit.

It was a time that I truly enjoyed the Winter Olympics. I remember rather vividly watching TV coverage of the Miracle On Ice. I recall watching the bobsled competition, the ski jumping and other winter sports, but nothing really took hold for me.

I remember in junior high school participating in winter carnival events – snowshoeing, speed skating, tobogganing – but no winter sport really took hold for me.

In the winter, I played high school basketball for the junior varsity and later varsity teams, and on the weekends I snowmobiled on or around Portage Lake or cross-country ski on some of the snowmobile trails in the forest behind my home on the hill overlooking the lake.

But nothing takes hold for me during these Winter Games in Vancouver. Granted, I watched in envy and awe at the women’s mogul competition in which two Americans and a Canadian stood to receive medals. And I watched a bit of the luge competition. The death of the competitor earlier in the week made it a morbid necessity, I suppose. And I watched a bit of Ohno racing and Vonn rocketing

I was born in Maine about as far north as you can go in this country, to be truthful, but I was born at about the summer solstice. I blame timing and the summer solstice, then, for not being a more enthusiastic cross-country skier or luger or hockey player.

As a child, I loved late spring and summer, running through the fields of wildflowers and mustard plants and into the forest, many times following the trails that had been cut for snowmobiles. All summer long I would play baseball, soccer, golf and rode a bicycle. And when I was not doing that, I was paddling a canoe, sailing a small sailboat or swimming in the cool Portage Lake. All the while, longing for the summer to last just one more day, one more week, one more month.

It doesn’t make me un-American to not care about the Winter Olympics. That might be akin to calling someone un-American for not liking baseball and failing to watch the World Series or someone not liking American football and not watching the Super Bowl.

Maybe next time I will strive to overcome my summer solstice-induced apathy toward winter sports and watch the coverage. Maybe.

Wescott sees waxing as winning | Portland Press Herald

 Wescott sees waxing as winning | Portland Press Herald.

Melting arctic could cost $2.4 trillion by 2050

Melting Arctic Could Cost $2.4 Trillion by 2050

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Maine Event: The audacity of slope | Portland Press Herald

 Maine Event: The audacity of slope | Portland Press Herald.

Thrills, chills and a near spill in the Valley – Bangor Daily News

Thrills, chills and a near spill in the Valley – Bangor Daily News.

Models brave cold for calendar shoot

(This is not the way I remember snowmobiling, but … — KM)

Models brave cold for calendar shoot

Quality trails draw riders – Bangor Daily News

 Quality trails draw riders – Bangor Daily News.

Snowmobile enthusiasts fuel $350 million economic boom statewide – Bangor Daily News

(Snowmobiling was a big part of my life as a youngster. At least, in the winter. I doesn’t surprise me that an outdoor activity such as snowmobiling is helping the economy. — KM)

Snowmobile enthusiasts fuel $350 million economic boom statewide – Bangor Daily News.

Winter driving tips that make (some) sense

Also spotted on DownEast.com the “Coffee With That” blog about driving in the snow. It is written by Maine novelist Richard Grant. The tips can be used by winter drivers in Maine or in the Sierra Nevada, for my California friends. Also, some of the tips are useful for driving on rain-slicked roads.